Top boys names 1900: Most popular baby names of 1900

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Most popular baby names of 1900

Most popular baby names of 1900 | BabyCenter

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Top baby names of 1900

1899All years

1901

Based on true popularity

  Girls

Boys

1 Mary John
2 Helen William
3 Anna James
4 Margaret George
5 Ruth Charles
6 Elizabeth Robert
7 Florence Joseph
8 Ethel Frank
9 Marie Edward
10 Lillian Henry
11 Annie Thomas
12 Edna Walter
13 Emma Harry
14 Alice Willie
15 Bessie Arthur
16 Bertha Albert
17 Grace Fred
18 Rose Clarence
19 Clara Paul
20 Mildred Harold
21 Gladys Roy
22 Minnie Joe
23 Gertrude Raymond
24 Pearl Richard
25 Mabel Charlie
26 Frances Louis
27 Dorothy Jack
28 Martha Earl
29 Hazel Carl
30 Ida Ernest
31 Irene Ralph
32 Myrtle David
33 Eva Samuel
34 Catherine Sam
35 Louise Howard
36 Edith Herbert
37 Sarah Andrew
38 Elsie Elmer
39 Esther Lee
40 Lillie Lawrence
41 Agnes Francis
42 Ella Alfred
43 Nellie Will
44 Mattie Daniel
45 Laura Eugene
46 Julia Leo
47 Josephine Oscar
48 Carrie Floyd
49 Viola Herman
50 Hattie Jesse
51 Ruby Michael
52 Lena Lewis
53 Jessie Tom
54 Mae Leonard
55 Cora Ray
56 Beatrice Clyde
57 Alma Benjamin
58 Willie Peter
59 Mamie Claude
60 Blanche Lester
61 Lucy Theodore
62 Fannie Russell
63 Lula Eddie
64 Jennie Frederick
65 Katherine Leroy
66 Marion Clifford
67 Lucille Anthony
68 Stella Jim
69 Rosa Jessie
70 Evelyn Martin
71 Pauline Edgar
72 Ada Chester
73 Thelma Ben
74 Virginia Edwin
75 Maggie Dewey
76 Vera Cecil
77 Maude Stanley
78 Beulah Lloyd
79 Dora Donald
80 Susie Homer
81 Daisy Harvey
82 Ellen Luther
83 Nora Norman
84 Sadie Johnnie
85 Leona Leon
86 Marguerite Bernard
87 Georgia Ed
88 Eleanor Hugh
89 Effie Patrick
90 Della Kenneth
91 May Leslie
92 Ann Victor
93 Kathryn Alexander
94 Nettie Philip
95 Olive Oliver
96 Bernice Mack
97 Lottie Horace
98 Sallie Milton
99 Nancy Guy
100 Betty Everett

1899All years

1901

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The Most Popular Baby Names by Decade | Local News

Trends constantly go in and out of style, and names are no exception. Thanks to popular culture, a name can be an indicator of the era a person was born — arguably now more so than ever. Of course, many classic names stand the test of time, so it’s up to you whether you want a timeless or more current option for your baby.

The genealogy experts at MooseRoots used data from the Social Security Administration to find the five most popular boys’ and girls’ names per decade from the 2000’s all the way back to the 1880’s. You can use this data to choose a name for your little one that will never go out of style.

The list is filled with classic favorites that have spanned generations, allowing you to see how much the times have changed — and in many cases the degree to which things have stayed very much the same. Enjoy a little history lesson by browsing the top names by decade to see if any sound right for the new addition to your family.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 2000s

Most Popular Names: Jacob, Michael, Joshua, Matthew, Daniel

Jacob — meaning ‘supplanter’ — was the most popular male name from 2000 to 2009. In total, the top five baby boy names during this time period were Jacob (12,877 per million), Michael (11,782 per million), Joshua (10,907 per million), Matthew (10,419 per million) and Daniel (9,579 per million).

Top Baby Girl Names of the 2000s

Most Popular Names:Most Popular Names: Emily, Madison, Emma, Olivia, Hannah

Emily — a medieval form of the Latin name Aemilia — was the most popular female name from 2000 to 2009. In total, the top five baby girl names during this decade were Emily (11,016 per million), Madison (9,512 per million), Emma (8,925 per million), Olivia (7,683 per million) and Hannah (7,666 per million).

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1990s

Most Popular Names: Michael, Christopher, Matthew, Joshua, Jacob

Michael — a common biblical name meaning ‘who is like God?’ in Hebrew — was the most popular male name from 1990 to 1999. In total, the top five baby boy names during this span were Michael (22,501 per million), Christopher (17,531 per million), Matthew (17,113 per million), Joshua (16,018 per million) and Jacob (14,517 per million).

Michael went on to become one of the five most popular boys’ names in the 2000s, but the frequency was less than half of what it was in the 1990s.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1990s

Most Popular Names: Jessica, Ashley, Emily, Sarah, Samantha

Jessica — believed to be derived from a biblical name that in appeared in the translations available during Shakespeare’s day, as Jesca — was the most popular female name from 1990 to 1999. In total, the top five baby girl names during this era were Jessica (15,431 per million), Ashley (15,366 per million), Emily (12,078 per million), Sarah (11,417 per million) and Samantha (11,405 per million).

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1980s

Most Popular Names: Michael, Christopher, Matthew, Joshua, David

Michael was again the most popular male name from 1980 to 1989. In total, the top five baby boy names during this span were Michael (34,506 per million), Christopher (28,850 per million), Matthew (23,863 per million), Joshua (20,621 per million) and David (19,948 per million).

If this list sounds familiar, it’s because the top four names went on to hold the exact same rankings in the 1990s, but each with fewer instances.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1980s

Most Popular Names: Jessica, Jennifer, Amanda, Ashley, Sarah

Jessica was also the most popular female name from 1980 to 1989. In total, the top five baby girl names during this period were Jessica (25,443 per million), Jennifer (23,893 per million), Amanda (20,037 per million), Ashley (19,086 per million) and Sarah (14,771 per million).

In addition to Jessica, Sarah also went on to become one of the five most popular names for baby girls in the 1990s.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1970s

Most Popular Names: Michael, Christopher, Jason, David, James

Michael was yet again the most popular male name from 1970 to 1979. In total, the top five baby boy names during these years were Michael (41,361 per million), Christopher (27,800 per million), Jason (27,056 per million), David (26,064 per million) and James (26,005 per million).

The 1970s marked the beginning of a three decade period where Michael and Christopher held the top two spots on the list.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1970s

Most Popular Names: Jennifer, Amy, Melissa, Michelle, Kimberly

Jennifer — a Cornish form of the name of King Arthur’s unfaithful wife Guinevere — was the most popular female name from 1970 to 1979. In total, the top five baby girl names during this decade were Jennifer (35,343 per million), Amy (16,342 per million), Melissa (15,387 per million), Michelle (15,136 per million) and Kimberly (13,919 per million).

Popular male names had a much frequency during the 1970s and most decades, meaning parents tended to get a little more creative when naming their daughters than their sons.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1960s

Most Popular Names: Michael, David, John, James, Robert

Michael topped the charts as the most popular male name from 1960 to 1969, which would be the first of its four decade reign. In total, the top five baby boy names during these years were Michael (42,481 per million), David (37,424 per million), John (36,376 per million), James (34,917 per million) and Robert (33,183 per million).

It’s interesting that Michael was the most popular boys’ name for 40 years, but the difference frequency between its first and last time topping the charts was nearly 20,000.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1960s

Most Popular Names: Lisa, Mary, Susan, Karen, Kimberly

Lisa — meaning devoted to God — was the most popular female name from 1960 to 1969. In total, the top five baby girl names during this span were Lisa (26,296 per million), Mary (18,795 per million), Susan (15,221 per million), Karen (15,135 per million) and Kimberly (13,709 per million).

Kimberly actually held the No. 5 spot in both the 1960s and the 1970s, with a difference in frequency of roughly 200.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1950s

Most Popular Names: James, Michael, Robert, John, David

James — a biblical name — was the most popular male name from 1950 to 1959. In total, the top five baby boy names during these years were James (41,113 per million), Michael (40,808 per million), Robert (40,462 per million), John (38,878 per million) and David (37,515 per million).

Look closely and you’ll notice the top five boys’ names from the 1960s are the exact same as the 1950s, just in a different order.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1950s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Linda, Patricia, Susan, Deborah

Mary — meaning drop of the sea — was the most common female name from 1950 to 1959. In total, the top five baby girl names during these years were Mary (31,701 per million), Linda (28,595 per million), Patricia (23,291 per million), Susan (22,182 per million) and Deborah (21,817 per million).

It’s interesting that Susan ranked one spot higher in the 1960s, despite a frequency difference of nearly 7,000.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1940s

Most Popular Names: James, Robert, John, William, Richard

James — a biblical name meaning that supplants, undermines, the heel — was again the most popular male name from 1940 to 1949. In total, the top five baby boy names during this era were James (52,501 per million), Robert (50,016 per million), John (46,949 per million), William (36,711 per million) and Richard (31,500 per million).

While parents opted for James more than any other name for their sons in the 1940s and 1950s, the frequency changed by more than 11,000 from the former to the latter decade.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1940s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Linda, Barbara, Patricia, Carol

Mary was again the most common female name from 1940 to 1949. In total, the top five baby girl names during these years were Mary (42,971 per million), Linda (35,694 per million), Barbara (28,551 per million), Patricia (27,622 per million) and Carol (19,626 per million).

In the 1950s, Mary and Linda remained in the same spots, but Patricia moved up to third place, despite the name’s frequency dropping by more than 4,000.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1930s

Most Popular Names: Robert, James, John, William, Richard

Robert — meaning bright, fame, famous — was again the most popular name for males born from 1930 to 1939. In total, the top five baby boy names during this period were Robert (54,437 per million), James (50,444 per million), John (44,959 per million), William (38,396 per million) and Richard (30,451 per million).

These names remained in the exact same rank in the 1940s, with the exception of James and Robert trading places.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1930s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Betty, Barbara, Shirley, Patricia

Mary was once again the most common female name for baby girls born from 1930 to 1939. In total, the top five baby girl names during this decade were Mary (51,869 per million), Betty (27,193 per million), Barbara (26,834 per million), Shirley (20,765 per million) and Patricia (19,969 per million).

The frequency difference between Mary and Betty is nearly 25,000, revealing the overwhelmingly popularity of longtime chart topper.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1920s

Most Popular Names: Robert, John, James, William, Charles

Robert was yet again the most popular name for males born from 1920 to 1929. In total, the top five baby boy names during this decade were Robert (50,678 per million), John (49,597 per million), James (45,311 per million), William (45,054 per million) and Charles (26,205 per million).

Charles is the only name on the list that didn’t go on to become one of the five most common boys’ names in the 1930s.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1920s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Dorothy, Helen, Betty, Margaret

Mary remained the most prevalent name given to baby girls born from 1920 to 1929. In total, the top five baby girl names during this time span were Mary (56,584 per million), Dorothy (29,743 per million), Helen (23,416 per million), Betty (22,826 per million) and Margaret (19,755 per million).

Despite Mary dominating the list for decades, it’s worth noting that girls’ names had much more variety than boys’.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1910s

Most Popular Names: John, William, James, Robert, Joseph

John — meaning the grace or mercy of the Lord — was the most popular name for baby boys born from 1910 to 1919. In total, the top five baby boy names during this period were John (54,159 per million), William (43,610 per million), James (39,588 per million), Robert (34,423 per million) and Joseph (20,409 per million).

For a period of five straight decades, James held the third place spot on the list, spanning from the 1880s through the 1920s.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1910s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Helen, Dorothy, Margaret, Ruth

Mary continued on as the most prevalent name for baby girls born from 1910 to 1919. In total, the top five baby girl names during this era were Mary (56,246 per million), Helen (29,161 per million), Dorothy (24,381 per million), Margaret (22,237 per million) and Ruth (20,409 per million). It’s interesting to note that while most of the names on the list were either added or changed position from the 1910s to the 1920s, frequency for each rank remained relatively similar.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1900s

Most Popular Names: John, William, James, George, Charles

John was again the most popular name for male infants born from 1900 to 1909. In total, the top five baby boy names during this period were John (57,644 per million), William (47,238 per million), James (42,365 per million), George (29,365 per million) and Charles (24,659 per million).

John, William and James held the top three spots from the 1880s through the 1910s.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1900s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Helen, Margaret, Anna, Ruth

Mary was yet again the most common female name from 1900 to 1909. In total, the top five baby girl names during this span were Mary (51,993 per million), Helen (22,351 per million), Margaret (18,647 per million), Anna (17,679 per million) and Ruth (16,421 per million).

In the 1910s, Margaret dropped from the third to the forth position, despite a 3,590 gain in frequency.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1890s

Most Popular Names: John, William, James, George, Charles

John was once again the most popular name for male infants born from 1900 to 1909. In total, the top five baby boy names during this period were John (65,513 per million), William (58,672 per million), James (41,194 per million), George (35,212 per million) and Charles (29,925 per million).

All five names went on to hold the same rank during the 1910s, but all except James experienced a drop in frequency.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1890s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Anna, Margaret, Helen, Elizabeth

Mary continued on as the most common name for baby girls born from 1890 to 1899. In total, the top five baby girl names during this span were Mary (55,723 per million), Anna (23,482 per million), Margaret (16,121 per million), Helen (16,063 per million) and Elizabeth (14,396 per million).

Elizabeth is the only name on the list that didn’t continue to rank in the top five during the 1900s.

Top Baby Boy Names of the 1880s

Most Popular Names: John, William, James, George, Charles

John topped the list of the most popular baby boy names for four straight decades, including 1880 to 1889. In total, the top five baby boy names during this period were John (76,412 per million), William (72,105 per million), James (45,921 per million), George (40,479 per million) and Charles (39,634 per million).

These five names held the same positions in the 1890s and the 1990s, but they had the highest frequency during the 1880s.

Top Baby Girl Names of the 1880s

Most Popular Names: Mary, Anna, Emma, Elizabeth, Margaret

Mary began its eight decade span as the most popular name for baby girls during the period of 1880 to 1889. In total, the top five baby girl names during this era were Mary (65,497 per million), Anna (27,264 per million), Emma (18,151 per million), Elizabeth (17,867 per million) and Margaret (15,576 per million).

Emma held the third place spot in both the 1880s and the 2000s, but the frequency was more than 9,000 higher the first time.

Research Thousands of Baby Names on MooseRoots

History of Russian names | Read articles on the history of the Russian Federation for schoolchildren and students

Gradually, different civilizations developed their own name book, conditioned by religious views, historical tradition and fashion trends. Therefore, the study of anthroponymy — an auxiliary historical discipline about names — allows a much more accurate understanding of the cultural foundations of society, revealing some details of the origin of different peoples, tracing the dynamics of preferences over the centuries, and correlating changes in naming with political changes in the state.

Pagan names in Rus’

The first personal names known to us in the East Slavic tribes are the names of the gods of the pagan pantheon. From chronicles, church teachings, folk tales and ancient Russian fiction, Perun, Khors, Dazhbog, Stribog, Simargl, Mokosh, Veles and others appear before us. And although Slavic mythology is very fragmentary, and the etymology is not always clear, the analysis of the names allows us to find out that some of the gods have Proto-Slavic roots — for example, Perun or Dazhbog, while others — Khors and Simargl — were introduced by nomads of Iranian origin or influenced by Iranian tradition (Sarmatians , Alans or Khazars).

Pagan remnants are preserved in Russian folklore and in the calendar in the form of all kinds of fairy-tale characters (Baba Yaga, Zmey Gorynych, goblin, shishigs, mermaids) and holidays that have merged with church holidays (Kolyada, Velik Den, Ivan Kupala), but the names of the Slavic gods and deities as personal names did not take root in Rus’. They were extremely rare in antiquity and almost never in later times. The exception was the female name Lada (the goddess of spring, according to Academician B.A. Rybakov), who had relative popularity in the middle of the 20th century, until they were called a well-known passenger car.

The pre-Christian segment of Slavic names was preserved in Rus’ until the middle of the 17th century. Thanks to scribe and bit books, as well as the fundamental dictionary of N.M. Tupikov, we know several thousand personal non-Christian Russian names. It turned out that for centuries after the adoption of Christianity in Rus’, there was a system of double naming, when, in addition to the baptismal name, many bore the “ordinary”, worldly name, which, as a rule, had pagan roots.

Many modern surnames are derived from similar worldly names. So, the names Wolf, Hare, Pike, Fish, Crow or Birch became the basis of the corresponding surnames. It happened that parents named their children without much sophistication. There were families where the sons were called First, Second, Tretyak, Chetvertak, Pyatak, Shestak, etc. As a trick to deceive evil spirits, newborns were called the unsightly names Fool, Failure, Trouble, Woe. Many believed that this would help protect children from the evil eye. Of course, in addition to the names-amulets, there were offensive nicknames that appeared throughout life, and it is not always possible to distinguish one from the other. Nicknames, like names, also became the basis for the formation of surnames.

Names in Ancient Rus’

The formation of the Old Russian state in the second half of the 9th century enriched the namebooks with Varangian names and two-syllable names of princes. Among several dozen names with Scandinavian roots, known under agreements with Byzantium, only a few received a long life in our country — Igor, Gleb, Oleg, as well as the female form of the latter Olga. They were widely used in the pre-Mongolian period in the princely environment and returned in the 19th century after the emergence of interest in their native history.

In the genus of Rurikovich, the most common were names ending in -mir, -polk, -slav: Vladimir, Yaropolk, Svyatoslav, etc. The name of the ruler was considered an important dynastic issue and was chosen taking into account the political situation. In the times of Kievan Rus, the name of the heir was given in honor of the deceased ancestor or relative, and since at the time of the birth of the heir the father, as a rule, was alive, the name of his son did not coincide with his own. This custom lasted for about three and a half centuries. That is why there were no “Yaroslav Yaroslavichi” or “Izyaslav Izyaslavichi” among the great princes until the beginning of the 13th century. The only exception was Prince Mstislav Mstislavich Udaloy, which gave some researchers reason to assume that he was born after the death of a parent.

The most important civilizational event in Russian history was the christening of Rus’ in 988 by Prince Vladimir the Great. This brought hundreds of names from the Byzantine name book into use. Over 90% of the names that are now perceived as primordially Russian came along with Orthodoxy, the alphabet, the Roman calendar and stone cathedrals at the end of the 10th — beginning of the 11th centuries. Most Christian names had Greek, Latin or Biblical roots. Their etymology is often transparent: «Konstantin» from lat. Constans (permanent) or «Basil» from the Greek. Basileos (royal). However, the names were given not as a wish for certain properties or qualities, but in honor of specific saints, whose celebration was close to the date of birth, and whose patronage they wanted to achieve.

As noted above, Christian names have long been combined in everyday life with pagan ones. This also applied to the rulers. For example, Prince Vladimir Vsevolodovich Monomakh was called in Christian terms Vasily Andreevich, and the hero of The Tale of Igor’s Campaign, Prince Igor Svyatoslavich, was called Georgy Nikolaevich.

In the XIII-XIV centuries. the Christian names of the rulers gradually replaced the worldly ones and became the main ones. It was then that princes with the names Ivan, Vasily, Mikhail, etc., began to meet in the annals in a multitude. Christian names became the basis for the formation of a huge number of the most popular Russian surnames — Ivanovs, Petrovs, Vasilievs, etc.

At the same time, some of the ancient princes were canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church, and their names moved from pagan to Christian. This applies to names of both Scandinavian origin — Olga or Gleb, and Slavic — Vladimir or Yaroslav. It is curious that the Christian names Faith, Hope and Love are Russian tracing paper from the ancient Greek names of the holy martyrs of the 2nd century Pistis, Elpis, Agape, although usually the names were used “as is”, naturally adapting them to the phonetics and morphology of the native language, but not translating literally.

Names in the Moscow State

Already in the calendar of the XIII century there were 330 male and 64 female names. The distribution according to the calendar and frequency determined the popularity of some and the rarity of other names. In addition, when choosing, the euphony of the name and the importance of the saint in the popular imagination played a role. People preferred to have as patrons George the Victorious or Nicholas the Pleasant, and not Akaki Cappadocia or Christodoulus of Patmos.

By the 17th century, a body of names was formed, «befitting» kings, nobles, merchants, monks or peasants. In addition, the same name was given in different forms depending on the estate of a person. So, the diminutive form in official documents meant a low status or a petition to high-ranking authorities. Therefore, the act documents of the times of the tsars Ivan the Terrible or Alexei Mikhailovich are full of Ivashkas, Petrushkas and Mikitki.

The most common male name of the 17th century is Ivan. It was in the lead by a wide margin. It got to the point that there could be several Ivanovs in the family at once. “Pervushka Tikhonov has the children of Ivashko, yes Ivashko, yes Ivashko, yes Ivashko,” we read in one of the censuses of the 17th century. The top ten popular names included Alexey, Andrey, Vasily, Grigory, Dmitry, Nikita, Peter, Stepan and Fedor. This group covered from 2/3 to 3/4 of the male part of the population in different regions of the country. Unfortunately, the calculation for the female half is extremely difficult, because. in the documents of that time, women often appeared without a name, but simply as «Semyon’s wife», «Mikhailov’s daughter», «Ivan’s son Andreev’s widow». Such formulations make up 80% of all female personalities. Only in the 18th century did personal female names enter the workflow with full rights.

Ivan became the main character in Russian folk tales. In them, he represented different social groups — Ivan Tsarevich, Ivan the Soldier, Ivan the Peasant’s Son — but he always carried a positive charge. Even if Ivan was considered a fool, in the end of the tale he always turned out to be both the smartest and the most courageous. The name «Ivan» acquired the features of a conceptual image that emphasizes the Russian national character. In the collection of A.N. Afanasyev’s name «Ivan» appears in 94 fairy tales. Vasily (15 mentions) and Fedor (8 mentions) are noticeably inferior to him. Among female characters, the most common name is Elena the Beautiful, she is Alyonushka. It occurs in 24 works. Next come Vasilisa (12 mentions) and Marya (12 mentions), Nastasya (10 mentions) and Anna (5 mentions). The heroines with these names are always beautiful and kind girls.

Names in the Russian Empire

In the Russian Empire, the processes of class stratification of the name word continued. A stable idea arose about the names appropriate for nobles, merchants or peasants. So, in the middle of the 18th century, the names Ivan and Vasily began to be perceived as colloquial, not befitting an aristocrat. Praskovya and Evdokia also thinned out among the landowners, although queens were called so a century earlier. In honor of the high society were Catherine, Anna and Elizabeth, but most of all — Mary. However, after this name had taken root in the village by the middle of the 19th century — many peasants called their daughters in honor of the ladies — it sharply declined among the nobility, because it «manipulated».

The following trend is clearly visible: the fashion for the name was set by the ruling class, and after a few decades the name was distributed among the peasants as “prestigious”. His popularity with the common people undermined the prestige of the aristocracy, and other names came into fashion. So, during the Great Reforms of the 1860s. the name Olga quickly gained popularity, pushing the former «champions» — Maria and Elena — from the first positions.

The most popular male names of the highest officials of the 19th century were Alexander and Nikolai. That was the name of the monarchs of that time. The bureaucracy was very sensitive to the naming in the royal family and drew conclusions. The appearance among the Grand Dukes of Konstantinov, Mikhailov or Vladimirov was immediately reflected in the families of Privy Councilors and Generals. In the peasant community, Ivan and Vasily remained out of competition. The merchant class loved exotic and varied names. Thus, the names of Savva, Vikula, Zakhar, Elisey, Abram, and others are found in the Old Believer family of entrepreneurs Morozov, one of the richest in the Russian Empire.

By the end of the 19th century, the number of names in the calendar increased to 900 male and 250 female. The church tried to limit the choice for the Orthodox with strict rules so that the name of the saint would be chronologically close to the date of birth, but judging by the list of the most popular names, this rule was rarely observed — otherwise the ten most common names would not have included names whose days fell one -Twice a year. Top 10 in 1900 looked like this. Male names: Nikolai, Alexander, Mikhail, Ivan, Vasily, Alexei, Sergey, Vladimir, Peter, George. Women’s names: Maria, Anna, Alexandra, Ekaterina, Claudia, Tatiana, Vera, Olga, Elizabeth, Elena.

Names in the USSR and the Russian Federation

The tectonic changes that took place in Russia in 1917 affected all spheres of society. The Bolsheviks called for the demolition of everything old and for a new life. The strongest blow fell on the church and religious rituals. Everything that was previously considered given by God was declared a relic and superstition. Surprisingly, in such extreme conditions, the Russian name book has not changed much. The names from the Orthodox Menologion remained the most popular, only changing in popularity depending on fashion.

Attempts by the communists to introduce new rituals — for example, October instead of christening, revolutionary names instead of Christian ones did not take root among the people and remained a historical incident. Someone I. Sukhoplyuev, the author of the pamphlet «Oktyabrina», published in Kharkov in 1925, recommended to conscious parents, among other things, the following names: Rebel, Narodosyn, Vanguard, Bebel, Dynamite, Krasnotsvet for boys; Barricade, Sunshine, Pravda (in honor of the newspaper), Rose (in honor of Rosa Luxembourg), Police for girls.

Among the turbulent revolutionary diversity, some success accompanied the names of Spartak, Marat and Vladlen, but in general, by the end of the 1920s. all the pathos of new names came to naught. Now such names — and they were composed by hundreds — remain only an occasion for jokes and witticisms. So, the famous linguist A.V. Superanskaya claimed that the scandalous name Dazdraperma (“Long live the First of May!”) Never existed, and it is only a figment of the imagination of an unknown joker.

However, the «revolutionary» names perfectly illustrate the spirit of the times. In parallel with Newspeak, arose, and a little later, at 1930s, the craze for «foreign» names reached its peak. It was then that Roberts, Arnolds, Eduards, Irma, Inga, Zhanna appeared in the USSR in a multitude. The fashion for such names declined sharply during the Great Patriotic War.

In modern Russia, cinema, television and the Internet have a great influence on the choice of a name. All sorts of shows, films, series, where hosts of entertainment programs, actors, athletes, bloggers shine, give their fans the opportunity to express their admiration with the help of naming children. There is a direct relationship between the popular detective story and the melodrama and a surge among the newborn names under which the main characters appeared. Another distinctive feature of modernity can be called a craving for exotic names, «so as not to be like others.» As a result, either completely forgotten names such as Frol, Stephanie, Thekla are brought to light, or names with a touch of paganism appear — Bozena, Zlata, Milena.

Nevertheless, today the most popular names are well-established and time-tested names — according to the results of 2022, these are Alexander, Mikhail and Maxim for boys, Sofia (Sofya), Maria and Anna for girls.

Cover: http://artpoisk.info

Names of 1900, name numerology

★ → Names → Names of the year → 1900

can be represented numerically from one (1) to nine (9).

Year

203620352034203320322031203020292028202720262025202420232022202120202019201820172016201520142013201220 112010200920082007200620052004200320022001200019991998199719961995199419931992199119
9198819871986198519841983198219811 980197919781977197619751974197319721971197019691968196719661965196419631962196119601959195819571956195519541953195219511950 194919481947194619451944194319421941194019391938193719361935193419331932193119301929192819271926192519241923192219211920191 9191819171916191519141913191219111910190919081907190619051904190319021

00

Gender

Doesn’t matter Male name Female name

Nation:

not selectedAbazaAbkhazianAvarAustralianAustrianAdygheAzerbaijaniAkkadianAlbanianAlgerianAltaiAmericanEnglishAnglo-SaxonAngolanAnimeArabicAramaicArgentinianArmenianAssyrianAfghanAfrican AmericanAztecBasqueBashkirBelarusianBelgianBiblicalBulgarianBosnianBrazilianBuryatianVainakhVedicHungarianVietnameseHawaiianGaulishDutchGothicGothicGreekGeorgianDagestanianDargindanishJewishEgyptianYiddishIngushNative American IndianIndonesianIranianIrish IcelandicSpanishItalianKazakhKalmykCelticKyrgyzChineseKoreanKurdishKhmerLakLatvianLezgiLithuanianMacedonianMariMongolianMuslimGermanNenetianNorwegianOssetianPersianPolishPortugueseRomanianRomanianRussianSabineSerbianSyrianScandinavianSlav YangSlovakSlovenianSovietTajikThaiTatarTeutonicTibetanTuvanianTurkishTurkmenianTurkicUzbekUyghurUkrainianWelshFinnishFrenchKhakassianChaldeanCroatianGypsyChamorroCircassianChechenCzechChuvashChukotianSwedishSwissScottishSumerianE sperantoEstonianYakutianJapanese

Number of the year 1900

The result of calculating the number of the year 1900 is: number 1 .

By alexxlab

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