Heartbeat 120 at 6 weeks: Science: At 6 Weeks, Unborn Baby’s Heart Rate is Approximately 110 Beats Per Minute

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Fetal Heart Beat






 





Fetal Doppler








Fetal heart at 16
weeks. There is a distinctly mechanical element to the flow.


Placenta and fetal movement at 16 weeks. This is more uniform,
smooth flow.


Placenta and mother’s iliac flow at 16 weeks. The mother’s pulse is
much slower than the fetal pulse.

Fetal heart at
28 week. There is more complexity to the heartbeat and the signal is
much stronger.

Placenta at 28
weeks. Placental flow continues to be smooth and not turbulent.


Maternal iliac vessels at 28 weeks. The pulse is slow, relative to
the fetus, and high-pitched, reflecting the rapid flow through the
vessels.

 


Although the fetal heart begins beating as early as the 5th week after the
LMP, your ability to detect it will be limited by your equipment.

An ultrasound machine usually will enable you to see a heartbeat by 5 to 6 weeks
gestation if equipped with a vaginal probe. Abdominal ultrasound will
usually see the heartbeat by the 7th-8th week of pregnancy.

If you use a Doppler ultrasound fetal heartbeat detector, you can,
with effort, usually hear the heartbeat by 12-14 weeks gestation and
routinely after that.

  • You aren’t really hearing the heartbeat. You are hearing the
    amplified «beat frequency» generated by the interaction between the
    outgoing ultrasound signal, and the returning ultrasound signal. When
    the outgoing signal is reflected back by a moving object (fetal heart),
    then the returning signal has a slightly higher frequency (if the object
    is moving toward the transducer), or slightly lower frequency (if the
    object is moving away). This is called the Doppler shift. Every so
    often, the peaks and valleys of these slightly different frequencies are
    superimposed on each other, creating a much louder sound, that happens
    to be in the audible range. It is this sound that you are hearing.

The normal rate is generally considered to be between 120 and
160 beats per minute.

  • The rates are typically higher (140-160) in early pregnancy,
    and lower (120-140) toward the end of pregnancy.

  • Past term, some normal fetal heart rates fall to 110 BPM.

  • There is no correlation between heart rate and the gender of
    the fetus.

Use a coupling agent (eg, Ultrasound jel, surgical lubricant, or even
water) to make a good acoustical connection between the transducer and the
skin.

Doppler fetal heartbeat detectors are moderately directional, so unless you
happen to aim it directly at the fetal heart initially, you will need to move
it or angle it to find the heartbeat.

Confirm a normal rate, and listen for any abnormalities in the rhythm of
the fetal heart beat.

Using a DeLee stethoscope (equipped with a head-mount), you can
sometimes hear the heartbeat by 16 weeks but unless you are practiced
with it, you won’t hear it until 20 weeks, at which time the mother can
usually tell you that she feels the baby moving.

Using a conventional stethoscope, you may never hear the fetal
heartbeat.

The Fetal Heartbeat in the First Trimester.

Using transvaginal ultrasound, the fetal heartbeat can be seen flickering before the fetal pole is even identified. Towards the end of the 5th week after the first day of the last period (LMP), and just 3 weeks after conception, a tiny embryo can be seen as a thin white line measuring approximately 2-3mm in length. This is called the fetal pole or fetal node. The fetal pole can normally be seen lying on the edge of the yolk sac, and in these very early stages, it may or may not have a heartbeat. If heart pulsations can be seen, they are usually slow at about 100 bpm (beats per minute). This is completely normal in a healthy ongoing pregnancy, and will increase to between 120-180 bpm by 7 weeks. In  a very early scan at 5-6 weeks just visualising a heart beating is the important thing. Failure to identify any cardiac activity in a fetal pole whose overall length is greater than 4mm is an ominous sign.

The first ultrasound scan in pregnancy is usually met with a combination of excitement and trepidation. As a sonographer, we see the relief in the faces of both parents when we show you the gestation sac containing a yolk sac and tiny fetal pole nestling in the uterus. We show you the flickering of the heart beat; tiny heart pulsations that are sometimes difficult to see. The next thing we are often asked to do is to listen for the baby’s heartbeat, even if they have clearly seen the pulsations.

So why don’t we use Doppler ultrasound to hear the heartbeat in the first 16 weeks of pregnancy? 

The British Medical Ultrasound Society guidelines state:

“Pulsed Doppler techniques generally involve greater temporal average intensities and powers than M-mode, and hence greater heating potential, due to the high pulse repetition frequencies and consequent high duty factors that are often used. In the case of spectral pulsed Doppler, the fact that the beam is held in a fixed position during an observation leads to a further increase in temporal average intensity. Colour flow mapping and Doppler power mapping involve some beam scanning, and so generally have a heating potential that is intermediate between that of B- or M-mode and that of spectral pulsed Doppler”. 

Cardiac activity should therefore only be demonstrated by a 2-dimensional video clip or M-mode imaging. The M-mode ultrasound collects information along the length of the beam. This disperses energy along the way and reduces the risk for heat cavitation in the fetus.  The use of pulsed Doppler in the first trimester is unsafe and should be discouraged, and it’s use does not outweigh the risk. The purpose is proof – proof of cardiac activity. We can do that safely with M-mode and obtain a heart rate.

So, this is the reason that pulsed wave Doppler should never be used in the first trimester. As sonographers, we are doing everything we can to protect your baby from unnecessary risk and are happy to show you the beating heart from as early as 6 weeks gestation. Some operators offer to record your baby’s heart in these early stages, but this is unsafe practice and should not be permitted.

Ultrasound equipment should only be used by people who are fully trained in its safe and proper operation; operators must have an appreciation of the potential thermal and mechanical bio-effects of ultrasound and demonstrate a full awareness of equipment settings. They have a good understanding of the effects of machine settings on power levels. Doppler (which is used to look at blood flow) is never used in early pregnancy when your baby is still developing, particularly with a transvaginal probe. However a transvaginal scan is perfectly safe for you and your baby and this is the standard procedure for an early scan of less than 8 weeks.

Is it possible to determine the sex of a child by heartbeat during pregnancy: myth or reality?

Content

  • 1 How to find out the gender of the baby by heartbeat during pregnancy: reality or myth?
    • 1. 1 What is the fetal heart rate?
      • 1.1.1 Determination
      • 1.1.2 The speed of the heartbeat
      • 1.1.3 The value for the medical diagnosis of pregnancy
      • 1.1.4 The heart rate and determination of the child’s floor
    • 1.2 What determines the gender of the child?
    • 1.3 Determination of the sex of a child by heartbeat: myth or reality?
    • 1.4 How is gender determined by heartbeat?
    • 1.5 At what stage of pregnancy can the sex of the baby be determined by the heartbeat?
    • 1.6 What are the chances of making a mistake when determining the sex of the heartbeat?
    • 1.7 What other methods are available for determining the sex of a child?
    • 1.8 Advantages and disadvantages of heartbeat sex determination during pregnancy
      • 1.8.1 Advantages
      • 1.8.2 Disadvantages
    • 1.9 How to influence the sex of the child?
      • 1.9.1 Myth or reality?
      • 1.9.2 What factors do not affect the sex of a child?
      • 1. 9.3 What factors can influence the sex of a child?
      • 1.9.4 Conclusions
    • 1.10 What do scientific studies say about the method of determining the sex of the fetus by heartbeat?
    • 1.11 How to properly prepare for gender determination by heartbeat?
    • 1.12 What questions should you ask your doctor if you decide to determine the sex of a child by heartbeat?
    • 1.13 Does the determination of the sex of the child by heartbeat affect the further course of pregnancy?
    • 1.14 Choice of fetal sex determination method
    • 1.15 Conclusions
    • 1.16 Related videos:
    • 1.17 Q&A:
        • 1.17.0.1 gender of baby by heart rate?
        • 1.17.0.2 Is heartbeat sex determination 100% accurate?
        • 1.17.0.3 Can the sex of a baby be determined by the shape of the belly?
        • 1.17.0.4 How often does the baby’s heartbeat change?
        • 1.17.0.5 Can the sex of the baby be determined by changes in the mother’s appetite?
        • 1. 17.0.6 Can the sex of the baby be determined from the shape of the mother’s breasts?
        • 1.17.0.7 What methods are available for determining the sex of a child during pregnancy?
        • 1.17.0.8 What factors can affect the results of determining the sex of a child by heartbeat?

Read the article and find out if it is possible to determine the sex of a baby by listening to its heartbeat during pregnancy. Find out what scientific studies and doctors say.

One of the biggest concerns for sophomore parents is determining the sex of their baby in the early stages of pregnancy. With the growing popularity of various tests and myths on this topic, doctors are increasingly getting questions about whether it is possible to determine the sex of a child by heart rate.

There are many cultural methods that some people claim can determine the sex of a baby based on different signs. However, the scientific community considers these methods to be myths, and there is no way they can be proven.

Instead, doctors use methods based on medical evidence. One such method is to determine the sex of a child by heart rate. But can this tool really determine the sex of the child? And if not, how accurate is it?

What is the fetal heart rate?

Definition

Fetal heartbeats are the rhythmic beats of the heart that can be heard during an ultrasound scan during pregnancy. Normally, the fetal heart begins to beat during the first 6 weeks of pregnancy and continues to beat until birth.

Heart rate

The heart rate can vary between 110 and 160 beats per minute. It may depend on the age of the fetus, the activity level of the fetus, the time of day, and other factors.

Significance for medical diagnosis of pregnancy

One important reason to check the fetal heart during pregnancy is to check the viability of the fetus. In the event that the heartbeat signal is not detectable, or is unusually low or high, this may indicate a problem with the fetus, such as respiratory disease, heart defects, or premature contractions.

Heartbeat and sex determination of the baby

It is known that the heart rate of the fetus can vary depending on the sex of the baby. However, this method is not reliable for determining the sex of a child and cannot be used as a basis for medical diagnosis. Therefore, if you want to know the sex of the child, you need to contact a specialist for ultrasound and other diagnostic procedures.

What determines the sex of a child?

The sex of a child is determined by chromosome pairs XX or XY. A woman has two X chromosomes, while a man has one X chromosome and one Y chromosome. At conception, if a sperm cell containing an X chromosome fuses with an egg, the child will be female; if a sperm cell containing a Y chromosome fuses with an egg, the child will be male.

For example, methods such as ultrasound, belly shaping, and heart rate readings can indicate the intended sex of an unborn baby. However, these methods are unreliable and cannot be used as a reliable way to determine the sex of a child.

As a result, the sex of the child is determined genetically and a reliable way to determine it is genetic analysis. Let’s use all other methods only as curiosity and entertainment.

Determining the sex of a child by heartbeat: myth or reality?

For a long time, people have been trying to determine the sex of the unborn child by various methods, including the receptionist’s heart rate. Some people believe that a high heart rate means a baby will be a girl, and a low heart rate means a boy. But how valid are these claims?

In fact, there is no scientific relationship between heart rate and sex. The heart rate can also be slowed or accelerated for many reasons, including the physical condition of the expectant mother, the child’s activity level, time of day, and other factors.

We can say that determining the sex of a child by heartbeat is pure guesswork and has no scientific basis. This method is not reliable and its use should not be based on the definition of planning for a future child.

In addition, it must be remembered that there are billions of people of different sexes on our planet, and each child is unique and has his own character and qualities, regardless of whether he is a boy or a girl.

How is gender determined by heartbeat?

Determining the sex of a baby by heart rate during pregnancy is a common myth with no scientific basis. Some people believe that the heart rate can indicate the sex of the unborn child. However, it is not.

If parents want to know the sex of their baby, there are more accurate methods such as ultrasound at 20-22 weeks of gestation or amniocentesis. However, these methods are invasive and involve certain risks for the baby and mother.

At what gestational age can the sex of the baby be determined by the heartbeat?

Many parents want to know the gender of their unborn child as soon as possible. One of the methods for determining the sex of a child is to study the baby’s heartbeat in the womb. There are many myths about this topic, but how real are they?

The fetal heart can usually be heard on an additional ultrasound as early as 6-8 weeks of gestation. However, to determine the sex of a child by heartbeat, a longer period of pregnancy is required, when the baby’s heartbeat stabilizes. This occurs between 18 and 25 weeks of pregnancy.

No method of determining the sex of a child is 100% accurate, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, first discuss with your doctor which gender determination method is best for you.

What are the chances of making a mistake when determining sex by heartbeat?

Determining the sex of a baby by heartbeat is considered a reliable method, but it is not completely accurate. Any method can contain an error, and studies show that when determining sex by heartbeat, an error is made in 5-10% of cases.

The main factors affecting the accuracy of heartbeat sex determination are maternal age and gestational age. In early pregnancy (before 14 weeks), sex determination by heartbeat gives a higher percentage of errors than at later dates.

It is also worth considering that the gender characteristics of each child are individual. For example, boys and girls may have different heart rates even during the same period of pregnancy.

It should be remembered that determining the sex of the child is only an additional bonus to the medical examination and is not its main subject. The main task of doctors during pregnancy is to ensure the health of mother and baby, and sex determination is only a small part of this complex.

What other methods are available for determining the sex of a child?

In addition to determining the sex of a child by heartbeat, there are other methods that consist of medical analysis. The most accurate and reliable method is ultrasound (ultrasound diagnostics), which in most cases allows you to identify the sex of the child in early pregnancy. This method allows you to see photos of the baby in the womb and conduct a detailed analysis of his body, including the genitals. You can also use amniocentesis, which takes a water sample from the fetus and then analyzes the chromosomes to help determine the sex of the baby.

In some countries, a mother’s blood test is also available to determine the sex of the baby. This method is based on the analysis of fetal DNA contained in the mother’s blood. However, this procedure can be quite expensive and not always accurate.

It is worth noting that any method used to determine the sex of a child has its limitations and may be unreliable in rare cases. Therefore, if determining the sex of the child is important for parents, it is better to consult a doctor and choose the most appropriate research method.

  • Ultrasound (ultrasound diagnostics)
  • Amniocentesis
  • Maternal blood to determine the sex of the child

It is important to understand that each method has its advantages and disadvantages, and you should not rely on only one method. Many parents want to know the sex of the baby in advance for preparation, but it is important to remember that the main thing in pregnancy is the health of both the expectant mother and the child, and sex determination is just additional information.

Advantages and disadvantages of the heartbeat sex determination method during pregnancy

Advantages

Ease of implementation: Determining the sex of a child by heartbeat is one of the most accessible methods. The method does not require special preparation and can be performed at any stage of pregnancy.

Non-invasive: This method does not harm the baby or the mother as it does not require any medical procedure. Instead, a standard ultrasound machine is used to measure the fetal heart rate.

Reliability: The baby’s heartbeat method can give a correct result in 80-90% of cases, depending on the gestational age.

Disadvantages

Errors in interpretation: Although this technique is quite reliable, misinterpretation of the data can occur in some cases, especially if the pregnancy is abnormal or there are difficulties in visualizing the fetus.

It is not always possible to use the method: Determination of the sex of the baby by heartbeat is not possible in the early stages of pregnancy, when the heart is still too small for an accurate measurement. Also, there are some restrictions on who can take this test due to the mother’s health or other medical conditions.

Data Incomplete: The heartbeat method cannot determine certain important factors such as the presence of genetic abnormalities or hereditary conditions of the child. Also, like any pregnancy test, it is not completely accurate and may give a false positive or false negative result.

How to influence the sex of the child?

Myth or reality?

There are many beliefs and fortune-telling about how to influence the sex of the unborn baby. Some people argue that it is possible to determine and even change the sex of a child by changing nutrition, body position, time of conception, and other factors. However, in scientific circles there is no consensus on this issue. Some studies are based on statistical data, but they do not provide a reliable answer to this question.

What factors do not affect the sex of a child?

If we talk about factors that do not exactly affect the sex of the child, then among them we can name the location of the uterus, the place of residence and the nationality of the parents. There is also no evidence that the use of different methods, such as eating certain foods or changing body position, can have a real effect on the sex of the unborn child.

What factors can influence the sex of a child?

However, there are several factors that can make you more likely to have a child of a particular gender. One such factor is the time of conception. Studies have shown that if sexual intercourse occurs on the day of ovulation, then the likelihood of conceiving a boy is higher. Also, some studies suggest that men who eat more high-calorie foods may have a greater chance of conceiving a boy.

Conclusions

In general, the question of whether it is possible to influence the sex of the child remains open. While there are some factors that can make you more likely to have a boy or girl, there are no guarantees. The main thing to remember is that the gender of the child is not the most important thing. The main thing is that your child grows up healthy and happy, regardless of their gender.

What do scientific studies say about the method of determining the sex of a fetus by heartbeat?

The method of determining the sex of the fetus by heartbeat is known to many pregnant women. However, many doctors consider it not entirely accurate and unreliable. Despite this, many women continue to believe in this method and determine the sex of the child even before the ultrasound.

Scientific studies have shown that when determining the sex of a fetus by heartbeat, the confidence interval is only 50-70%. This is due to a large number of factors that can affect the heart rate. For example, in some babies, the frequency may be below or above the norm, which also complicates the determination of sex.

In addition, this method does not take into account possible genetic anomalies that can lead to changes in the heartbeat. This can lead to the child being erroneously identified as a member of the opposite sex.

Therefore, do not rely solely on the method of determining the sex of the fetus by heartbeat. A more accurate result can only be obtained after an ultrasound examination. Do not forget that the main priority is the health of the baby, not his gender.

How to properly prepare for sex determination by heartbeat?

Determining the sex of the baby by heartbeat is a common method during pregnancy. But to get accurate results, you need to properly prepare for the procedure.

1. Seek an Experienced Technician

Choose a doctor who has experience with high quality ultrasound equipment. Only such a specialist will be able to ensure the correct determination of the sex of the child.

2. Determine the optimal period for the procedure

Wait until 16-20 weeks of pregnancy to determine the sex by heartbeat. During this period, the baby’s heartbeat becomes more noticeable and distinct, which allows you to get the most accurate result.

3. Prepare for your procedure

Before your procedure, you must fill out a special form with information about your health, diseases and medications you take. In addition, the doctor may ask you not to eat or drink for several hours before the procedure.

4. Relax

The heartbeat sex determination procedure is not painful or dangerous for the baby. However, you may experience slight discomfort during the procedure. Therefore, it is very important to relax before undergoing the procedure.

By following these simple tips, you will be able to prepare for determining the sex of your baby by heartbeat in the most effective way. Be sure to discuss the procedure with your doctor and follow all his recommendations.

What questions should you ask your doctor if you decide to determine the sex of a child by heartbeat?

Determining the sex of a child by heartbeat is a topic that interests many parents. If you decide to determine the sex of the child by heartbeat, you should consult a doctor. Below we will tell you what questions you need to ask your doctor to make sure that the sex of the child is correctly determined.

  1. How often do I need to have an ultrasound to determine the sex of my baby?
  2. How do you determine the sex of my baby by heartbeat?
  3. What are the chances of making a mistake when determining the sex of a child by heartbeat?
  4. Are there any reasons why the determination of the sex of a child by heartbeat may be incorrect?
  5. What advice can you give me to improve my chances of correctly determining the sex of my baby by heartbeat?

Do not forget that determining the sex of a child by heartbeat is not a 100% guarantee of the correctness of the result. If you want to be absolutely sure about the sex of the child, then you should consult a doctor who will perform an amniocentesis — this is a more reliable method for determining the sex of the child.

Does determining the sex of a child by heartbeat affect the further course of pregnancy?

Determining the sex of the baby by heartbeat is a popular method, but is it possible that this may affect the further course of the pregnancy?

Fortunately, determining the sex of a child by heartbeat does not have a direct effect on the further course of pregnancy. However, some parents may decide to adjust their thinking and plans based on the gender of the baby, which can affect their emotional state and preparation for the birth of a child.

In addition, determining the sex of a baby by heartbeat can lead to erroneous results, especially if done by a non-professional. With the wrong sex determination, parents can face frustration and stress, which can also affect their future health and well-being of pregnancy.

Thus, although determining the sex of a child by heartbeat is a method of interest to parents, it is important to remember that this does not affect the further course of pregnancy. Parents should be prepared for the birth of a healthy child, regardless of gender, and be positive about their future role as parents in order to prepare for it safely and happily.

Choosing a method for determining the sex of the fetus

There are many methods for determining the sex of the child — from ultrasound diagnostics to testing the mother’s blood for derived chromosomes. However, not all of them are equally effective and accurate.

Ultrasound is considered one of the most accurate and popular methods for determining the sex of the fetus. This is a non-invasive procedure that is carried out in a polyclinic or private clinic under the supervision of a specialist. During an ultrasound examination, you can see the sex of the child if he does not hide his genitals during the examination.

A blood test for chromosome derivatives is another popular method. The analysis determines the hormones that are contained in the blood of the mother and change their values ​​depending on the sex of the fetus. This method is also considered one of the most accurate.

Mother’s feelings can also help to presumably determine the sex of the child, however, this method of determination is not considered accurate enough and cannot be used as the only method.

  • It is important to understand that the choice of method for determining the sex of the fetus should be based on the effectiveness and accuracy of the method, as well as on the personal preferences and capabilities of the mother and her family.
  • It is not feasible to focus on only one method — it is recommended to use several and cross-compare their results. Remember that determining the sex of the child is not an end in itself of pregnancy, so when deciding on the choice of method, it is worth considering its cost and the risks that it may carry for mother and child.

Conclusions

Studies show that it is not possible to determine the sex of a baby by heart rate during pregnancy. There is an opinion that if the heart rate in the fetus is above 140 beats per minute, then it is a girl, and if it is lower, it is a boy. However, this message is a myth.

Expectant parents can only find out the gender of their baby through special medical examinations such as ultrasound and amniocentesis. However, it must be remembered that such studies may be associated with certain risks for the child and can only be carried out for medical reasons.

Thus, if future parents want to know the sex of a child before its birth, then they need to contact specialists and conduct appropriate medical research, and not rely on various popular superstitions and myths.

Video on the topic:

Question-answer:

How often can you determine the sex of a child by heartbeat?

You can determine the sex of the baby by heartbeat at any time of pregnancy, but the most accurate results are obtained by a study at 6-8 weeks of pregnancy.

Is determining the sex of a baby by heartbeat 100% accurate?

No, heartbeat sexing is not 100% accurate. There is a certain percentage of errors, especially if the baby’s heartbeat could not be captured or if the fetus is actively moving during the study.

Is it possible to determine the sex of a child by the shape of the abdomen?

No, determining the sex of a child by the shape of the abdomen is a myth. The shape of the abdomen depends on many factors, including the height and weight of the mother, as well as the position of the baby in the womb.

How often does the baby’s heartbeat change?

The baby’s heartbeat may change depending on the age and physical condition of the baby, as well as changes in the mother’s body. Usually, the heart rate at the beginning of pregnancy is 140-170 beats per minute, then gradually decreases to 120-140 beats per minute by 20 weeks, and then remains at the same level until the end of pregnancy.

Is it possible to determine the sex of a child by changes in the mother’s appetite?

No, determining the sex of a child by changes in the mother’s appetite is a myth. A mother’s appetite can change for many reasons, including hormonal changes, stress, and various illnesses.

Is it possible to determine the sex of a child by the shape of the mother’s breasts?

No, determining the sex of a child by the shape of the mother’s breasts is also a myth. The shape of a mother’s breasts can change due to many factors, including age, hormonal levels, and physical activity levels.

What methods are available to determine the sex of the baby during pregnancy?

There are various methods for determining the sex of a baby during pregnancy, including fetal heart testing, ultrasound, amniocentesis, and chorionic biopsy. Each of these methods has its own advantages and disadvantages, and the choice of method depends on many factors, including the condition of the mother and the risks to the baby and mother.

What factors can affect the results of determining the sex of a child by heartbeat?

The results of determining the sex of a baby by heartbeat can be affected by various factors, including the presence of multiple pregnancies, the uncertainty of the baby’s sex, the position of the baby in the womb, and the age of the mother.

When you hear beats in your stomach during pregnancy

Listening to the fetal heartbeat is one of the most exciting things to do during pregnancy. But when do they start to feel? The most exciting moment of the first gynecological examination is the opportunity listen to the baby’s heartbeat .

The doctor makes you go to bed and the ultrasound shows you a «small green bean» and then a heartbeat. It’s your baby’s heart beating so fast. But, since when is it heard and how long does it beat?

Index

  • 1 At what week can you start feeling your baby’s heartbeat?
  • 2 Fetal heart rate: how much it beats
    • 2.1 Evolution through pregnancy
    • 2.2 Comorbidities
  • 3 How heart rate is heard and monitored
  • 4 How to listen
  • 5 Abnormal fetal heartbeat
    • 5.1 Symptoms and causes
    • 5.2 Test and diagnosis

What week can you start feeling your baby’s heartbeat ?

Fetal heartbeat can be detected at 34 days (just under 6 weeks) of pregnancy by high frequency and good quality transvaginal ultrasound.

At 6 weeks, corazón The embryo, which is now beating 110 times per minute, has four empty chambers, each with an inlet and outlet for blood to flow in and out. In another two weeks, this number will increase to 150-170 beats per minute.

With all this growth, it is likely that you can hear the fetal heartbeat for the first time around 9-10 weeks of pregnancy, although the exact day may vary. At this point, it will beat at about 170 beats per minute, a speed that will slow down from now on. To hear it, the doctor or midwife will place a portable ultrasound device called a doppler on the abdomen to amplify the sound.

Fetal heartbeat: how much it beats

Heartbeat first appears on ultrasound around 6 weeks pregnant . The fetal heart rate during this phase is usually between 100 and 120 beats per minute (bpm).

The normal fetal heart rate (HR) typically ranges from 120 to 160 beats per minute (bpm) in utero. It can be measured by ultrasound from about 6 weeks, and the normal range varies during pregnancy, increasing to about 170 beats per minute at 10 weeks and subsequently dropping to about 130 beats per minute at term.

Evolution through pregnancy

Although the myocardium begins to contract rhythmically within 3 weeks of conception (from spontaneously depolarized pacemaker cells in the fetal heart), it first becomes visible on ultrasound at about 6 weeks of gestation. Therefore, heart rate is usually around 100-120 beats per minute. (bpm).

Then the heart rate gradually increases over the next 2-3 weeks and becomes:

  • ~110 bpm (average) for 5-6 weeks
  • ~170 bpm after 9-10 weeks

This is followed by a decrease in heart rate, which on average becomes:

  • ~150 bpm over 14 weeks
  • ~140 bpm for 20 weeks
  • ~130 bpm per semester

Although the heart rate of a healthy fetus is usually regular, fluctuations of 5 to 15 beats per minute can be tolerated.

Comorbidity

Slow fetal heart rate is called fetal bradycardia and is usually defined as: 3 weeks pregnant or

  • Heart rate <120 bpm between 6. 3 and 7.0 weeks
  • Fetal heart palpitations are called fetal tachycardia and are usually defined as:

    • HR > 160-180 bpm 5.7
    • A heart rate of about 170 beats per minute may be classified as borderline fetal tachycardia.
    • Rapid and irregular fetal heart rate is commonly referred to as fetal tachyarrhythmia.

    How heart rate is heard and monitored

    The baby’s heartbeat can be heard in different ways: at regular intervals (periodic auscultation) or continuously (electronic fetal monitoring (EMS).

    intermittent auscultation

    This is where your baby’s heartbeat is heard at regular intervals using a pinard or a small portable ultrasound device called a Doptone. . If you are in good health and have had a smooth pregnancy, this is the recommended way to listen to your baby’s heartbeat during labour.

    Midwives and doctors listen to your baby’s heartbeat for a full minute, every 15 minutes after labor begins, and more frequently as labor approaches.

    Continuous Electronic Fetal Monitoring (EFM)

    This is where your baby’s heartbeat is constantly monitored using a paper-based device called a cardiotocograph. (KTG). The EFM machine works with two pads (transducers), each the size of a pad, attached to the abdomen by two elastic straps. One is located in the upper abdomen so that it is over the upper end of the uterus (womb) to catch your contractions; the second will be placed on your abdomen, over the area where your baby’s heartbeat is best heard.

    The information received from the sensors is converted by the electronics inside the machine to produce a graph paper printout. EFM using two external sensors is a non-invasive method. Sometimes, for reasons that will be explained to you, the baby’s heartbeat is recorded using a small electrode that is placed on the baby’s head and connected with a thin wire to the machine, which means that you must have an internal pulse ((vaginal). to check for this to happen .

    how to listen

    A device known as the sound of an angel ( angel voice) is a household device that detects the fetal heartbeat, a kind of miniaturization of the detector used during an obstetric visit. There are they with headphones or with a speaker and a screen, and it is enough to put them on the stomach to listen to the baby’s heartbeat.

    Fetal heart rate detectors are safe and reliable products when they carry the European Import Approval (CE Mark) to ensure their quality. And they are safe for the fetus.

    Advice — use it from the 12-14th week of pregnancy until the 20th week.

    abnormal fetal heartbeat

    The rhythm of a healthy heart requires careful coordination in order to properly pump blood throughout the body. This rhythm is controlled by electrical impulses that allow the filling and emptying of the four chambers of the heart to be synchronized. Many conditions can cause the electrical impulses that control the heart to be irregular. too fast (tachycardia) or too slow (bradycardia).

    Fetal cardiac arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats, are a common reason for referral to a fetal cardiologist. In most cases, a too slow or too fast heartbeat is temporary. In these cases, your team will closely monitor your pregnancy. Less than 2% of fetal arrhythmias are true cardiac arrhythmias.

    At 16 weeks of gestation, the fetal heart is fully formed and beats at a rate of 110 to 160 beats per minute (bpm).

    Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are often classified as one of the following:

    • Bradycardia : heart rate below 100 beats per minute
    • congenital heart block
    • premature atrial contractions ( PAC )
    • supraventricular tachycardia atrial flutter: heart rate over 180 beats per minute

    Symptoms and causes

    The condition is often first noticed when a doctor listens to the fetal heartbeat around 10-12 weeks of gestation.

    By alexxlab

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