Maths symbols display: Math Symbols — Wall Display by Gifted and Talented Teacher

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KS1 & KS2 Printable Maths Posters and Signs

Maths Topic Display Headings Posters (SB4280)

A set of printable posters with headings for the most common maths themes.  Includes an editable background to enable you to create your own additional posters if required.



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Large Mathematical Symbol Signs (SB147)

The main mathematical symbols arranged on A4 in both colour and black.  +, –, =, x and ÷.  Great for use in large-scale number sentences or for hanging in your classroom.



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Mathematical Symbols on Footballs (SB1018)

The main mathematical symbols arranged on A4-sized footballs.



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Mathematical Vocabulary Posters (SB69)

A colour-coded set of posters featuring the common mathematical operations and words/questions linked to each.



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Numbers Display Border (SB3275)

Print your own border for a Numbers or Numeracy display.  Cut out the strips and assemble around your display board.



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Numeracy-Themed Display Border (SB2718)

Print your own border for a maths display.  Cut out the strips and assemble around your display board.

CLASSROOM PHOTO




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Maths Area Signs (SB675)

A useful and colourful group of signs for use in your maths area.  Labels include the words ‘numbers’, ‘count’, ‘coins’ 2D and 3D, each with relevant artwork and clear text.



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Mathematical Vocabulary Flowers (SB403)

A colour-coded set of A4 flowers, each showing a mathematical sign in the centre and the related vocabulary on the petals.

CLASSROOM PHOTO



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Maths Area Question Posters (SB6274)

A set of posters for your classroom maths area posing simple questions to prompt children in their activities.



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Mathematical Super Powers Poster Set (SB7376)

A set of superhero-themed posters featuring various maths strategies and reminders to display in your classroom.  Includes an editable poster to add your own ‘mathematical super powers’ as needed.



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Visual Maths Target Posters (SB1669)

A set of 16 colourful A4-sized posters featuring visual prompts showing useful reminders for maths work.



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Numeracy Mental Strategies Signs — Boys (SB302)

A set of 10 A4 signs to help remind children of the different mental strategies they can apply when working with number problems.  Aimed at Key Stage 1.



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Numeracy Mental Strategies Signs — Girls (SB304)

A set of 10 A4 signs to help remind children of the different mental strategies they can apply when working with number problems.  Aimed at Key Stage 1.



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Mathematical Symbols Group Table Signs (SB10429)

Print out these foldable tabletop signs for use with your Maths classroom groupings.  Print on card, laminate and fold.  Ideal for Literacy groups.



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Mathematical Symbols Group Signs — A4 (SB10430)

Print out these A4 signs for use on your class Maths group displays.



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2D Shapes-Themed Group Table Signs (SB1583)

Print out these foldable tabletop signs for use with your classroom groupings.  Print on card, laminate and fold.  Great as maths group signs.



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2D Shapes-Themed Group Signs — A4 (SB1584)

Print out these A4 signs for use on your class group displays.  Great as maths group signs.



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3D Shapes-Themed Group Table Signs (SB1587)

Print out these foldable tabletop signs for use with your classroom groupings.  Print on card, laminate and fold.  Great as maths group signs.



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3D Shapes-Themed Group Signs — A4 (SB1588)

Print out these A4 signs for use on your class group displays.  Great as maths group signs.



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Crocodile >  and < Signs (SB1078)

Two printable crocodile pictures with open mouths to show mathematical greater than ‘>’ and less than ‘<’ signs.



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Mathematical Operations Banners (SB3145)

5 colour banners featuring the main mathematical operations and associated vocabulary.




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Editable Maths Area Fold-Over Cards (SB4833)

Editable fold-over cards to place in your classroom maths area — great for all sorts of uses.  Use them to specify activities for pupils to complete, list pupils/groups that can play in the area or remind children of important rules to adhere to.



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Bee a Buzzing Mathematician Display Banner (SB10326)

A colourful motivational banner for your classroom maths wall display.



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Today’s Special Number Banner and Poster (SB3201)

A set of printable flash cards to accompany the Phase 2 ‘Today’s special number’ activity outlined in the DCSF ‘Numbers and Patterns’ publication (PDF page 88).



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Maths Area ‘I can’ Signs (SB73)

A colourful set of useful signs with ‘I can…’ statements for use in your classroom Maths Area.



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Math Symbols Posters with Vocabulary

  • Non-Editable

    Non-Editable:  PDF

  • Pages

    Pages:  5

  • Grades

    Grades:  2 — 5

Students can often identify the mathematical symbol, but what about all of the different names for it?

Who would have thought that one mathematical application would have so many names? Students need to build their mathematical vocabulary in order to decipher what the question is asking them to do. Put these posters up in your room to act as a constant reminder about the mathematical symbols and the different terms associated with them.

Check out our blog for amazing classroom display ideas.

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Do-it-yourself math package for Android / Sudo Null IT News

The reason for writing this post was the article «Mathcad Express — a free math editor that few people know about. »

I enjoyed the discussion about this article. However, I am more interested in a slightly different aspect of the problem under discussion, namely: is a computer algebra system needed on a smartphone or tablet, or is it such a strange cockroach in the head of an IT engineer?

Problem statement

As you know, the life of a simple programmer is hard and unsightly. About a year ago, when I realized the computing capabilities of my Chinese phone with four cores on the Android platform, I wanted to shake off my scientific antiquity and calculate something on my phone. Play-market can do everything, I thought then.

There were no special restrictions, during my scientific career I managed to use Mathcad with MATLAB, and Mathematics, and FEM-systems (Ansys). So I started looking at everything.

There is such a picture (I will not provide links, those who wish can easily find it on the Play-market):

  • Matlab Mobile, as an extension of the licensed copy of the desktop version. I didn’t have one at home, so this option, unfortunately, has disappeared;
  • The Wolfram Alpha service and a bunch of tutorials from the Wolfram Group are not exactly what I associate with the words “calculate yourself”;
  • Matlab and Octave clones for Android are already warmer, but writing code on a 5-inch screen is not very convenient;
  • A huge number of scientific calculators of varying degrees of sophistication. They all have one thing in common — the input and presentation of results are organized as in a classic (hardware) graphical calculator. The main disadvantage of such an idea is the lack of a “document” that can be saved, modified and recalculated again and again;
  • Nothing resembling Matkad could be found then.

Why did I mention Mathcad here and at the beginning of the post? In my opinion, this idea is well suited to the tasks of mobile mathematics:

  • On a small device screen with a finger-oriented interface, it is still more convenient to work with a formula if it is written in a natural mathematical form, and not in the form of code in a scripting language;
  • A mobile device is good for trying something quickly. Therefore, a convenient interface is required from a mobile mathematical system, but serious computing capabilities are not required;
  • Ideally, in such a system, the function «I’m promoting» is needed. That is, not only quickly write down a complex formula and build a couple of graphs, but also conveniently publish it on all your social networks. Formulas in natural mathematical notation are also more convenient here than a script.

That is, I would be happy to install Mathcad mobile on my smartphone. But here it was (in the sense of «Matkad», and not a smartphone) on the Play-market and it was not. Hence the idea was born to develop something similar independently.

Problem statement

So, I decided to write an Android application from scratch, designed to create and work with mathematical calculated documents.

I formulated the requirements for the application as follows:

  • Maximum coverage of supported devices. Hence the minimum API level 8;
  • Support for screens of various resolutions and landscape/portrait orientation;
  • Document storage format — custom based on XML;
  • Detailed documentation. In order not to produce entities, the same format is used for documentation in which the documents themselves are stored;
  • To create printed documentation, provide for export to LaTeX, as it is convenient for writing formulas and makes it possible to generate PDF;
  • Mathematics is limitless. Not everything can be implemented. Therefore, the initial functionality includes functions of many variables, graphs (2D and 3D), numerical integration and differentiation, and a logical operator. Further, depending on the users’ Wishlist;
  • Ability to insert text and images, but text editing functionality is minimal to begin with;
  • Usability and quality take precedence over functionality;
  • Only those languages ​​that I know myself and can develop and support without recourse to an interpreter.

And, probably, the most important thing. This is a hobby. Therefore, it is important to remain realistic and not aim at something that cannot be realized by one person in a reasonable time in the mode of 5-6 days a week for 2 hours.

Since the project has received the status of «favorite hobby for the next year», there are two important consequences:

  • Goals such as «Make money at any cost» and «Be in the top» are not set, so I decided not to add ads to applications and refuse promotion through incentivized downloads.
  • At the same time, I am against complete freebies. Therefore, I chose the following monetization model:

    • The application itself is paid and is distributed only through the Play Store;
    • There is a free version with identical look and feel, but with reduced math. Moreover, this functionality is not deactivated, but is absent at the code level. That is, the free version cannot physically be switched to the full mode and it is distributed wherever possible.

    This model is easily implemented using a version control system (in my case, SVN), where the main branch is for experimentation and development, and two child branches are for paid and free releases, respectively.

    At this point, we can draw a line under the input and start discussing the implementation.

    Solution method

    In my opinion, the most important question is how to organize on a smartphone the input and editing of formulas that can be calculated (for a start only numerically), but at the same time they are presented in a natural mathematical form? How to compose a single document capable of self-computing from these formulas, graphs, text and images loaded from a file?

    Many of you have probably used Word’s formula editor. On the big screen, but with a keyboard and mouse at hand, everything is very simple. Various mathematical palettes are visible on the screen (or easily accessible from the menu), the cursor is positioned with the mouse, and then the desired character is entered either from the keyboard or from the palette with the mouse. Part of the formula can be easily selected with the mouse, copied, replaced or dragged to another location. The formulas themselves, as floating objects, can be dragged with the mouse to any part of the document. Familiar, right?

    And now the same thing on a touch screen, no mouse, no hardware keyboard, where the virtual keyboard covers a third (half in landscape orientation) of the screen?

    Let’s start with the layout of the objects in the document. In fact, there are not very many options:

    • Each object has its own coordinates and objects can be arranged relative to each other arbitrarily, as in a vector graphics editor. It is this option that is implemented in Matkad itself. Under Android, you can use the obsolete AbsoluteLayout for this, but you must implement the alignment / distribution of objects and groups of objects. That is, in this option, an additional user interface is needed that is not related to the main task. For a desktop computer, this is not critical, but the usability of a mobile application, in my opinion, will be worse from this;
    • Location in table cells, as in MS Excel. I dismissed this option right away, since a mathematical document is anything but a table;
    • A simple list, where each object is on its own line. This is how most scientific calculators are designed. This is exactly what I implemented in the first version of the application. Cheap and cheerful. To which I received quite reasonable comments from users that this method is very inconvenient, since there is an objective need to group some formulas by rows;
    • The result is a simplified version of the RelativeLayout, a kind of two-dimensional list, where by default objects are added vertically (from the bottom of the selected object), but with a single window, you can add an object both to the right and left of the selected one:

    So far, I have abandoned the mode of grabbing and dragging objects when moving a finger across the screen, since such an interface in the case of a two-dimensional list requires some work. Instead, the possibility of group selection of objects and group operations through the context menu is implemented: deletion, copying to the clipboard and replacing the selected object with the contents from the clipboard.

    The next question is about entering information. Many calculators have their own virtual math keyboard for this. I don’t think this approach is optimal. For example, I myself use a tablet with an external USB keyboard, in which case it has a landscape orientation. Rolling out a virtual keyboard in such a situation, which occupies half the screen, is not entirely logical. Therefore, I initially aimed at the fact that the application would work with the standard system keyboard and not require special keyboard extensions. That is, absolutely all mathematical symbols can be entered as a code from the keyboard, and this idea is again borrowed from Matkad. To enter Greek characters, I simply added Greek to the keyboard layouts.

    However, forcing the user to remember all the codes is not a good idea. Therefore, at the bottom of the screen, regardless of orientation, there is a second toolbar, identical in design and size to the top main one. All mathematical symbols, of which there are now about 50, are arranged in one line on this panel, and it itself scrolls to the right and left. With a short press, the character is entered. With a long press on the symbol, a hint pops up what it is and what code it corresponds to:

    In support of this idea, I want to quote a review from one of the users: “Being able to use shortcuts instead of symbolic buttons (but not beeing forced to do so) makes the app perfect”.

    Where are codes or symbols entered? Here again everything looks like Matkad. When adding an object, empty input fields appear. You can enter text, numbers, or symbols into them. When you enter, for example, a division symbol, instead of the input field, a fraction appears with two fields, one of which will transfer the text entered earlier in the deleted field. This is the main input mode, which is good when you know exactly the sequence of typing the desired formula:

    What if you don’t know or you need to change something in the formula? Context menu to help. It is activated by long pressing on a part of the formula and provides access to the clipboard. In addition, there is a button to expand the selection area. From the bottom toolbar, you can enter a symbol that will be applied to the selected block:

    A kind of cooperation has turned out. The user, entering the formula in this way, does the main work on its parsing. And the application will calculate the formula in gratitude for this.

    So each formula has two aspects:

    • First, it’s a hierarchy of nested layouts that contain both input fields and mathematical notations. Visually, this is a common formula.

    • Secondly, it is a hierarchical structure of primitive mathematical tokens, each of which can be calculated. Each token is associated with its corresponding layout and is its owner.
    Pitfalls

    And here a serious ambush awaited me. De facto, Android has a limit on the number of nested layouts, related to the size of the procedure call stack. The compiler will not say anything in this case, but during operation (in the android. view.View.draw method of one of the nested layouts), the application crashes with an exception of the StackOverflowErrors type. More about it here.

    Catching this exception is real, since I have my own implementation of the onDraw() method at the very beginning of this chain of calls, but at the same time, starting from a certain complexity of the formula, it simply stops being drawn. I had to manually control the nesting depth of the formula elements, and, starting from a certain critical depth (selected experimentally), issue an unsympathetic, but still necessary message “Unfortunately, the formula depth limit for this version of Android has been reached.”

    Experimentally, I picked up the following maximum depth values, counting from the root RelativeLayout fragment:

    • if API level < 15 (Android 2.2.x - 4.0.x), then the maximum depth is 7 nested levels of layouts;
    • if API level is from 15 to 17 (4.1.x — 4.2.x), then 9 levels;
    • if API level > 17 (4. 3.x and above), then 15 levels.

    The second problem is the lack of a standard component that would combine horizontal-vertical scrolling and zooming. These actions seem to be supported by WebView, but WebView itself does not suit me in any way. The solution is clumsy, but it works — I took the sources of the standard ScrollView and HorizontalScrollView, combined them into one component and screwed the detection and handling of the scale change. What I could not bring to mind at the same time is the correct positioning in the document after changing the scale.

    Documentation and localization

    Reading user reviews on the Play Store about various scientific calculators, I found that one of the weak points of most calculators is the lack of documentation. Sometimes complete. Therefore, I decided to pay a lot of attention to the documentation. And he added it both to the application itself (the NavigationDraver side menu turned out to be convenient for this purpose), and posted it on the web as a PDF and added links for direct download to the application.

    The application stores documentation sections in XML and opens them as separate frames. There is a function to convert the document to LaTeX. The pdfletx utility in the workplace does the trick. The result is not ashamed to put on public display.

    Now a few words about localization. Development according to the old habit is carried out in English. When the program is compiled and launched (that is, ready for sale), the interface and documentation of the newly added feature are translated into two other languages, one of which is Russian.

    And here I was pleasantly surprised by the download statistics in the developer console. Mathematics in Runet is held in high esteem! By the way, I did not release the Russian version immediately, but when the number of downloads approached a thousand. But this did not practically increase the already high percentage of downloads from Russia and neighboring countries. At the moment, the distribution of downloads for the free version by language and country looks like this:

    That is, Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan together provide more than 40% of downloads. The paid version paints a different picture: downloads from Russia dominate by only a small margin.

    Conclusion

    Well, a lot has already been written, it’s time to round off. From a computational point of view, many necessary things have not yet been implemented: there are no complex numbers, there is no support for arrays, there is not even primitive matrix arithmetic, there is no solution of equations. But here a reasonable question arises — is it necessary on the phone? It is interesting to hear the opinion of a respected audience.

    As for the immediate tasks, so far the main wishes of users relate to increasing export opportunities. For example, one of the last comments: “I’m interested in such a question, is there any way to link a document with a matcad? So that it would be possible to finalize the document on a PC. As for Matkad, I personally doubt it, since the format is proprietary, but such things as exporting to HTML (just today I discovered the MathJax framework), to PDF, or some open office format can be implemented.

    On this I would like to thank everyone who read to the end for their attention, and take my leave with a sense of accomplishment. I will be glad to questions, if any.

    Create equations and formulas — Microsoft Support

    Using Word for Study

    Using Word for Study

    Using Word for Study

    Create equations and formulas

    • Create equations and formulas

      Article

    • Indent the first line of a paragraph

      Article

    • Set double line spacing in a document

      Article

    • Creating a bibliography, citations and references

      Article

    • Inserting footnotes and endnotes

      Article

    Further:

    Improving readability and ease of use

    1. Select Insert > formula or press ALT+=.

    2. Select the desired equation.

    3. Additional parameters structures and transformations , see the ribbon.

    Press 9 to start a new formula from scratch0225 Alt += on the keyboard.

    or

    Insert
    formula >> insert the new equation .

    You can write the formula with your finger, pen or mouse.

    Additional parameters structures and transformations , see the ribbon.

    Adding a formula to a collection

    1. org/ListItem»>

      Highlight the formula you want to add.

    2. Click the down arrow and choose Save as New Formula… .

    3. In the Create New Building Block dialog box, enter a name for the formula.

    4. In the collection list, select Formulas .

    5. Press button OK .

    To change or edit previously created formulas:

      org/ItemList»>

    1. Select a formula to open the tab Working with Formulas in the Ribbon.

      Note: If you don’t see the Formula Tools tab, the formula was probably created in a later version of Word. If so, see Modify a formula created in a previous version of Word.

    2. Select Designer to see tools for adding various elements to the formula. You can add or change the following formula elements.

      • Group Symbols contains mathematical symbols. To see all characters, click the More button. To view other character sets, click the arrow in the upper right corner of the gallery.

      • In group Structures presents structures that can be inserted. Simply select an element and then replace the placeholders in the outline (dash-dotted boxes) with the values ​​you want.

      • Parameter Professional displays the formula in a professional format optimized for display. Parameter Linear displays the formula as source text, which you can use to make changes to the formula if necessary. The Linear option displays the formula in either UnicodeMath or LaTeX format, which can be selected in the Transforms block.

      • You can convert all formulas in a document to Professional or Linear format, or just one by selecting a math zone or hovering over a formula.

    On touch and pen-enabled devices, you can write formulas with a pen or finger. For handwriting formula

    1. Select Draw > Convert Ink to Math and then select Ink Equation at the bottom of the embedded gallery.

    2. Use a pen or finger to enter a freehand math formula.

    By alexxlab

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