Picture prompts for story writing: 145 Picture Prompts to Inspire Student Writing

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Picture Prompts Write-Abouts (Years 1-3)









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Picture Prompts Write-Abouts (Years 1-3)

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Description

Students typically write stories and then illustrate them. This fun booklet reverses that process so that the picture cues can provide prompts for storywriting.

Students flip through the sections to select an illustration of a character, an item, and a setting, and then they use those elements as prompts for a terrific story idea. For example, a student may describe the colourful chaos that occurs when a clown is chased by a bee in a paint store.

Suitable for ages: 5+ years

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picture prompt | A Journey of Words

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Write a scene from this image. What’s going on in this picture? Describe how the people involved are feeling at this moment, both physically and emotionally. Could there be more than meets the eye?

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

/ Kristi / 6 Comments

Every month I think this is the month I’ll come up with my own topic for the Insecure Writer’s Support Group post. And then I look at the optional question, and I really want to answer it! This is the case again this month. So, here’s the posed question:
Has a single photo or work of art ever inspired a story? What was it and did you finish it?

My high school creative writing class has stuck with me for fifteen years. We went through a process of coming up with multiple story seeds, before then choosing the one we wanted to develop into a story. For example, we were instructed to come up with a setting and character that didn’t really go together. I chose a British soldier at a Minnesota lake.

We also each got a random pictures or post card that the teacher had brought in. The picture above is what I ended up with, and from it came the seed that I used to write the short story that I turned in for a grade. It opened with a husband & wife searching through a field of wild flowers for a briefcase as part of a ransom demand. I really enjoyed writing it, and it reminded me of how much I had loved writing fiction when I was younger (by high school, I’d temporarily abandoned fiction to write poetry).

What I find really funny is that in my end-of-class reflection paper, I apparently wrote that I didn’t think I’d have much reason to write fiction again in the future. Fortunately, that wasn’t true, and within 4-5 years, I was writing fanfiction, the gateway to my current writing.

Nowadays, I enjoy and really recommend using pictures as writing prompts for writing practice, and I know it all goes back to that creative writing class.

For my fellow writers, has an image ever inspired you to write?

IWSG Blog Hop, Powered by Linky Tools
Click here to enter your link and view other blogs in the IWSG…

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Examples of ways to use this picture seed:

1. Write a scene that takes place in this setting.

2. Write a setting description based on the above picture. Try to include all five senses. Whatever your instincts or preferences for setting and detail, try to over-exaggerate the scene.

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

**If you’re looking for more like this, you might want to check out the story seeds posts I wrote for NaNoPrep a few years ago. They are not specific to NaNoWriMo, and each contains a list of several different types of prompts or ways to generate story ideas. You can find them here: Story Seeds 1, Story Seeds 2, Story Seeds 3, Story Seeds 4**

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

I hope that everyone who sees this is having a great Christmas! In honor of the holiday, here is today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

What are the animals doing?
Who is hiding here, and what are they running away from?
What happens to the toys on Christmas Day?

(Picture & questions from Story World: Christmas Tales)

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

**If you’re looking for more like this, you might want to check out the story seeds posts I wrote for NaNoPrep a few years ago. They are not specific to NaNoWriMo, and each contains a list of several different types of prompts or ways to generate story ideas. You can find them here: Story Seeds 1, Story Seeds 2, Story Seeds 3, Story Seeds 4**

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Write a scene from this picture:

(Picture from Story World: Christmas Tales)

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

**If you’re looking for more like this, you might want to check out the story seeds posts I wrote for NaNoPrep a few years ago. They are not specific to NaNoWriMo, and each contains a list of several different types of prompts or ways to generate story ideas. You can find them here: Story Seeds 1, Story Seeds 2, Story Seeds 3, Story Seeds 4**

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Write a scene from this image. What’s going on in this picture? What are the names of these people? What are their relationships to each other? What are they doing here? Give them real personalities and lives.

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Write a scene from this image. What’s going on in this picture? Describe how the people watching are feeling at this moment. What is the atmosphere like? What will happen next?

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Examples of ways to use this picture seed:

1. Write a scene that takes place in this setting.

2. Write a setting description based on the above picture. Try to include all five senses. Whatever your instincts or preferences for setting and detail, try to over-exaggerate the scene.

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

**If you’re looking for more like this, you might want to check out the story seeds posts I wrote for NaNoPrep a few years ago. They are not specific to NaNoWriMo, and each contains a list of several different types of prompts or ways to generate story ideas. You can find them here: Story Seeds 1, Story Seeds 2, Story Seeds 3, Story Seeds 4**

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

**If you’re looking for more like this, you might want to check out the story seeds posts I wrote for NaNoPrep a few years ago. They are not specific to NaNoWriMo, and each contains a list of several different types of prompts or ways to generate story ideas. You can find them here: Story Seeds 1, Story Seeds 2, Story Seeds 3, Story Seeds 4**

/ Kristi / Leave a comment

Here’s today’s Writing Wednesday Prompt:

Introduce these people as a cast of characters in a story. What are their names? Why are they here together? What are their relationships to each other? Which one is the clown? Which one is the serious one? Who would be the main character (if any)? Who would be the one that can’t seem to catch a break? Give them real personalities and lives.

If you write something from this prompt, by all means let me know! Feel free to share what you wrote, if you want!

**If you’re looking for more like this, you might want to check out the story seeds posts I wrote for NaNoPrep a few years ago. They are not specific to NaNoWriMo, and each contains a list of several different types of prompts or ways to generate story ideas. You can find them here: Story Seeds 1, Story Seeds 2, Story Seeds 3, Story Seeds 4**

We develop speech: drawing up a story from a picture. — English

Drawing up a story from pictures is a universal way of developing conversational speech. Firstly, it is universal in that it serves as a canvas, and therefore writing a story is within the power of even «techies», i. e. people who are not accustomed to literary activity. Secondly, the method is suitable for any level of language proficiency, from elementary (description of facts) to high (connecting fantasy and describing the characters of the characters, the moral of the story, etc.).

The productivity of the method is based on the fact that completely different situations are usually described by a fairly similar set of «skeleton» words — verbs, adjectives, adverbs. Only nouns change. For example, when we describe a city, we may need to know words such as «traffic», «crossroads», «skyscraper»; if we describe nature, — «forest», «field», «hill».

Thus, four tasks are solved:

1. the golden stock of frame words is trimmed (for example, the repetition of verbs when narrating in the past tense),
2. gaps are detected and eliminated ( when the author of the story suddenly finds that he cannot formulate this or that thought, for example, when conveying the thought «he fell asleep» — a translation is offered «he slept», which actually translates «he slept» ; this is how the new word «fall asleep» is found out, which is necessary in meaning — «fall asleep»).
3. vocabulary is being enriched depending on the topic,
4. ALL grammar is being worked out at the same time (because a sufficiently wide grammatical arsenal is required to fully describe any situation).

General recommendations.

Grammar.
1. Past tense narrative preferred («One day a man woke up in the morning and…),» if it does not contradict the logic of the process.
2. Strict adherence to sentence structure (first place — who, second — what does, etc., see the picture)

Vocabulary
3. Emphasis on familiar words, try to make no more than 30% of new words, and all of them would be mastered in the course of writing the text.
4. Enriching sentences with adjectives and adverbs He went to the [green] forest [very fast] so that the sentence is full.

Idea.

1. There is no need to «uniformly» describe the picture. The author of the story can focus, for example, on the first picture, entering the desired description, or on the last, paying attention to the epilogue.
2. If the level allows — you can supplement the description of the chain of events with reflections ( «They went for a walk on Sunday. … Such families always go for a walk on Sunday, it’s their family tradition ).

Examples.
As it was said, the same picture can be described at different levels.
Level 1 — see here — http://englishhunters.livejournal.com/4458.html

Level 2 — see here — http://max-fon-weichs.livejournal.com/12783.html

Students in help. For those who are not used to writing, here are some tips to get into the «image» of the writer.
Essay creation steps, — http://english-hunters.livejournal.com/8601.html.

composing a story based on plot pictures, theatrical techniques

Contents

  • 1 When to start teaching a child to retell and compose stories
  • 2 story pictures
  • 2.2 The use of theatrical elements
  • 2.3 Retelling based on main events
  • 3 How to teach a preschooler to write stories
    • 3. 1 Description of an object or toy
    • 3.2 Making up a story from a series of story pictures
    • 3.3 Coherent description of the image in the picture
  • 4 Support for the free expression of personal stories and impressions
  • 9 0004 Among the parents of preschoolers there is an opinion that the child should retell can only read. But for the development of memory, attention, speech, it is necessary to teach the baby to remember the text he heard and convey it in his own words. To teach a child to retell at preschool age means to contribute to his development and make a good start for the upcoming schooling. These skills are necessary for future first graders to retell the text, write a presentation or essay.

    When to start teaching a child to retell and write stories

    Learning to retell depends on age and takes place in stages. Starting with a simple enumeration of the main characters and their actions, the child gradually learns to pay attention to more and more details. Almost any children’s work written in prose will work for this purpose. Poems are not subject to retelling.

    Teaching children to retell can be started after 3 years. Vocabulary at this age already exceeds 1500 words, and the speech of a child at 3-4 years old needs constant training.

    To do this, use small fairy tales familiar to children. For example, «Turnip», «Kolobok», «Teremok». Learning takes place based on leading questions from an adult or pictures. For example, the kid retells the fairy tale «Turnip». Leading questions for an adult: Who planted the turnip? What kind of turnip has grown? Who began to pull the turnip? Whom did the grandfather call? Whom did the grandmother call?..

    A good clue for a 4-year-old child what to talk about is toys that correspond to the plot. They should be shown as the events of the story or fairy tale unfold.

    For preschoolers after 5 years, the modeling method is effective in retelling. For example, to help a child retell «Three Bears», each character can be associated with a circle of a certain size or color (Masha is a pink circle, the older bear is brown, etc. ). Focusing on these settings, preschoolers retell the story with the help of an adult.

    At senior preschool age, children learn to write stories on their own. The first attempts at storytelling for most children begin at 5 or 6 years of age. First, the children describe the toys. Subsequently, the process becomes more complicated. Preschoolers move on to compiling a story from pictures. An even greater advancement is the ability of the child to formulate a few sentences while looking at a photograph or an artistic canvas.

    Methodical techniques that help children learn to retell

    Preschoolers of different ages have their own peculiarities of retelling. When a child of 3-4 years old manages to mention all the main characters of a fairy tale, he demonstrates with all his appearance that the task has been completed and does not want to linger on the plot any longer. Children 4-5 years old can interweave corrections at their own discretion into the retelling, while at 5-6 years old they are no longer satisfied with textual inaccuracies.

    You can teach a preschooler to memorize and retell using the following techniques:

    • Repeated reading or telling a fairy tale to adults. The child must be able to listen to the end.
    • Examination of illustrations and a conversation about what has been drawn. This will later allow you to rely on pictures.
    • Questions about the plot of the fairy tale. Their adult asks for a verbal prompt.
    • The use of a flannelgraph on which the figures of the heroes of a fairy tale are laid out. They should appear gradually in accordance with the plot of the story.
    • Small toys — fairy-tale characters serve as a hint when retelling.
    • Elements of dramatization. Children play a fragment or the whole fairy tale.
    • Fixing the main events with some markers, and then retelling based on the key events.
    • Simulation method.
    • Mnemonic tables in which the plot is reproduced using pictograms.

    The listed methods are aimed at making the child remember more details of the piece he heard. Let us dwell on the most popular of them in practice.

    Using reference story pictures

    Story pictures are a fairly common means of developing speech. However, this method has both its obvious advantages and a significant disadvantage. Looking at the pictures, the child is often limited to situational speech, not trying to connect his story into a single whole. This is especially true for younger preschoolers.

    Algorithm for teaching storytelling by reference plot pictures:

    1. Reading fairy tales to adults.
    2. Conversation about reading. Explanation of incomprehensible, complex words. For example, in the fairy tale «Gingerbread Man», these are the expressions «by the bottom of the barrel», «by the box, it is swept.»
    3. Repeated reading with a mindset for subsequent retelling. An adult demonstrates reference pictures while reading. They can be arranged in stages on a magnetic board.
    4. Retelling by a child based on plot pictures.

    To make the child’s message more detailed and complete, it is necessary to keep his attention on each picture longer with additional questions and clarifications.

    The use of theatrical elements

    Preschoolers consolidate the ability to retell in theatrical activities. Many children are happy to portray fairy-tale characters.

    If you offer a child not just to retell a fairy tale, but to speak for the main characters, he diligently tries on the images. At the same time, his speech is filled with expressive means. The child changes the timbre and melody of speech, adds gestures and facial expressions characteristic of the image.

    Elements of theatricalization are successfully used in kindergarten in the classroom for artistic and aesthetic development. After the children listen to the piece, they are offered «hats» or other elements of the characters’ costume. In the process of joint presentation of the plot, preschoolers not only learn to retell, but also develop dialogic speech. Gradually, children master the norms of literary pronunciation, develop coherent speech.

    Retelling based on the main events

    In order to make it easier for children to verbally reproduce a work of art, it is necessary to discuss key events with them beforehand. For example, the fairy tale «Three Bears». Who lived in the house? What were their names? Who came to the house? What did she do? What happened when the bears returned home? How did the fairy tale end?

    How to teach a preschooler to write stories

    Leaving stories is taught in stages. First, this is a description of the object or toy. The next stage is the description of the image in the picture. Then it is necessary to teach children to tell from pictures connected by a single plot. Number of pictures from 4 to 6.

    Preschoolers are already making up stories, showing their own creative thinking. The order of presentation is very important. For example, compiling a story based on a picture corresponds to the following algorithm:

    1. Beginning of the story: “Once…”.
    2. All people depicted in the picture have names, and animals have nicknames.
    3. Coming up with characters’ dialogue.
    4. Describes the action of the characters.
    5. The name of the story is thought up.

    An effective technique for teaching storytelling is games and play exercises. For example, «Journey to Sochinyayka». Purpose: to teach to compose, improvise, act out dialogues. An adult begins to tell stories about toys, animals, children, and preschoolers continue. When in doubt ask leading questions.

    Description of an object or toy

    Description of an object or toy is based on its most salient characteristics. For example, color, shape, taste, smell, purpose of the object. How can a child describe an apple: “This is an apple. It is red (red-sided, green…), round, sweet (sour), grows on a tree, a fruit.” This description is voiced by children of senior preschool age.

    The story of the kids is the answers to leading questions of an adult and consists of 2 — 3 sentences. For example, the description of the ball: «This is a ball, it is big, red.»

    Drawing up a story from a series of plot pictures

    Learning to make up stories from a series of pictures begins with information about its structure. A preschooler should know that a story has a beginning, a main event and an end. Children learn to come up with a different beginning for stories, their name.

    It is important to be able to voice the dialogue of the characters present in the pictures. A series of proposed pictures consists of 2-6 images. Each picture is described, combined with others into a single plot.

    A coherent description of the image in the picture

    The picture offered to children for description should be accessible to their understanding. For example, at 3 years old it is “Cat with Kittens”, and for older preschoolers it can be images of nature, plots, still life. For example, «Children on a walk», «Spring», «On the hill».

    Paintings by famous artists can be used in the preparatory group. For example, I. Levitan «Big Water» or V. Vasnetsov «Alenushka». The preschooler describes the main objects, gradually moving on to additional ones. When describing a picture, children actively use adjectives.

    Supporting the free expression of personal stories and experiences

    Children enjoy sharing personal experiences with others. They willingly convey their experiences, emotions, feelings. There is a development of coherent monologue speech of preschoolers. Themes for the stories: “Kindergarten”, “Family”, “Journey to the sea”, “Visiting grandma”, “Buying a new toy”. The role of an adult is to direct the flow of children’s information in the right direction. When telling stories from personal experience, children should be able to:

    1. Stay on topic;
    2. Accurately indicate the time and place of the events that happened to the preschooler;
    3. Use the exact names of objects, names, actions in the story.
    4. The story must be completed.

    By alexxlab

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