What is unifix cubes: 13 Ways to USE Unifix Cubes

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13 Ways to USE Unifix Cubes

Unifix Cubes are colored, interlocking blocks. Unifix Cubes are Math Manipulatives that are used by Elementary Students, Middle Students and even High School Students. The Unifix Cubes are also great manipuliaves for chidlren with learning disabilities.

We use the Unifix Cubes for counting, patterns, basic operations, probability, graphing, sorting and measurement. Using the Unifix cubes really helps my daughter visually. My daughter needs a hands on strategy to aide her in Mathematics, her least favorite subject. I have plenty of manipulatives around our classroom, but her favorite go-to manipulative seems to be the Unifix Cubes.

Unifix cubes are colored, interlocking blocks. We use the Unifix Cubes for counting, patterns, basic operations, probability, graphing, sorting and measurement. Using the Unifix cubes really helps my daughter visually. The cubes represent the numbers in her equations or problems and aide her in understanding the necessary procedure for figuring out the math problem{s}.

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Some of my Favorite Finds From Amazon :

Didax Unifix Cubes (100 count)

Learning Resources Mathlink Cubes, Educational Counting Toy, Set of 100 Cubes

The interlocking cubes are useful for counting.

The most basic concept of sorting colors is a snap with Unifix Cubes. You can also sort by number of cubes.

We use the cubes in a game to create patterns. I show a pattern and hide it and she needs to recreate it for me from memory. In addition, we use patterns to learn skip-counting. Another pattern exercise is to select an A-B pattern, A-B-C pattern, A-B-A-B pattern . . . really any pattern you can dream up. Like Simon with Unifix.

Select a sum and build a tower of cubes to that number. Have your child determine the different ways to add the sum using different colored cubes. This activity will build a foundation for number sense, addition, and subtraction.

If each cube has a buddy, the number is even. If one cube is left out, the number is odd.

Practice estimates by picking up cubes and ‘estimating’ how many you selected. One hand selection, two hand selection, sibling selection, parent selection.

The concept of addition is putting together numbers to form a greater number. Simply give your child a problem and let them use the cubes to «add». The concept of subtraction is taking apart numbers to form a smaller number.

Unifix Cubes come with 100 cubes divided into ten different colors. You can learn to skip count from two’s to ten’s with the colors available.

Once you have simple addition, subtraction and skip counting down, you can ease right into Multiplication because Multiplication is repeated addition. Select 30 cubes, colors are not important and simply make stacks of cubes using the number selected to count to. Practice math facts, one to five using fingers and cubes. Place a cube on three fingers of one hand. This represents three groups of 1 {3 X 1 = 3}.  Place a second cube on each finger, representing 3 groups of two {3 X 2 = 6}.  And so on practicing up to 10.

Use the cubes to show the meaning of a perfect square.  Use a grid to show how 3 rows of 3, 3 X 3 = 9, create a perfect square. 

When you are teaching place value, make sets of 10 unifix cubes and leave other cubes separated as ones.

The cubes are perfect for developing the concept of a fraction. A child can easily understand the concept of numerator and denominator. Build a line of ten cubes using two colors. Ask what fraction is blue and what fraction is yellow.

Unifix cubes are certainly versatile little things. Whether you are a teacher, homeschooler, or a parent looking for a way to make math homework easier to understand, you’ll definitely want to pick up a set of these colorful cubes!

 

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Unifix Cubes

Unifix cubes are great for counting, grouping, patterning, measurement, and sorting activities. They are among the most widely used manipulatives used during math time. You will find them often as part of our Focus on the Child series, where we look closely at the math thinking taking place in a child’s development.

Unifix cubes are one of many objects considered manipulatives. Manipulatives can allow children to interpret, represent, and comprehend a variety of math concepts while using real-world examples they are able to touch and feel. Other common manipulatives in the early years include wooden blocks, color tiles, and pattern blocks

Series:
Focus on the Child

January 29, 2019

Regardless of how high a preschooler can rote count, a child’s sense of what those numbers actually mean develops gradually. We call this understanding number sense, and it requires relating numbers to real quantities.

  • Topic:
    Number Sense
  • Age/Grade Level:
    Pre-K, Kindergarten
  • Tags
    Gesture, Dot cards, Estimation, Unifix Cubes, Subitizing
Series:
Focus on Play

September 26, 2018

The Match ‘Em All Game

This bingo-like game allows children to think about numbers in different ways. It focuses children on the attribute of quantity of small sets and helps them build a more robust number sense.

  • Topic:
    Number Sense
  • Age/Grade Level:
    Pre-K, Kindergarten
  • Tags
    Games, Dice, Unifix Cubes, Subitizing
Series:
Focus on the Child

June 11, 2015

Estimating Quantity with Child 3

A student approximates the number of cubes in collections of increasing quantity.

  • Topic:
    Number Sense
  • Age/Grade Level:
    Pre-K, Kindergarten
  • Tags
    Child 3, Estimation, Unifix Cubes, Comparing
Series:
Focus on the Child

June 11, 2015

Estimating Quantity with Child 8

A child estimates the number of cubes in a collection.

  • Topic:
    Number Operations
  • Age/Grade Level:
    Pre-K, Kindergarten
  • Tags
    Unifix Cubes, Comparing, Child 8, Estimation
Series:
Focus on the Child

April 3, 2014

Estimating Quantity with Child 9

A child estimates the number of cubes in a collection.

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